• Comparative Covid Response

    Crisis, Knowledge, Policy

    Comparative Covid Response: Crisis, Knowledge, Policy (CompCoRe) is a comparative study of national responses to the COVID-19 pandemic from a science and technology studies (STS) perspective. Led by Stephen Hilgartner (Cornell University) and Sheila Jasanoff (Harvard University), the core research team comprises researchers from five continents and sixteen countries.

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  • Comparative Covid Response

    Crisis, Knowledge, Policy

    Comparative Covid Response: Crisis, Knowledge, Policy (CompCoRe) is a comparative study of national responses to the COVID-19 pandemic from a science and technology studies (STS) perspective. Led by Stephen Hilgartner (Cornell University) and Sheila Jasanoff (Harvard University), the core research team comprises researchers from five continents and sixteen countries.

CompCoRe is one of the largest qualitative comparative projects investigating national responses to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The intellectual framework for CompCoRe is grounded in theories and methods developed in the field of science and technology studies (STS). Team members include senior and junior STS and legal scholars, as well as, activists and policy analysts. The diversity of the country team members reflects the scope and breadth of expertise and perspectives being contributed to the project. Teams from Core countries work collaboratively to define research questions, generate data, share analytic insights, and produce academic papers, policy briefs, and other forms of analysis. 

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  • Tokyo, Japan

  • South Africa

  • Taipei, Taiwan

  • Paris, France

  • Lima, Peru

  • Malmö, Sweden

  • Bondi beach, Australia

  • Seoul, South Korea

  • Shenzen, China

  • Bergamo, Italy

  • Los Angeles, United States

  • Vienna, Austria

  • Durgapur, India

  • Vatican City

  • Singapore

  • Amsterdam, Netherlands

  • Ipanema beach, Brazil

  • London, UK

  • Berlin, Germany

    History

    The CompCoRe project was conceived by Stephen Hilgartner, Cornell University, Sheila Jasanoff, Harvard Kennedy School, and their long-standing colleagues and collaborators, affiliated with the Science and Democracy Network (SDN). As the Covid-19 pandemic ravaged the world in April 2020, Hilgartner and Jasanoff applied for the National Science Foundation’s Rapid Response Research (RAPID) Grant on the Covid-19 pandemic. They launched the project on May 1 after receiving NSF funding. 

    The project aimed to answer an enduring question that long preoccupied STS scholars and policy makers: what makes expert knowledge credible, legitimate, and reliable for use in public policy? In the context of the pandemic, the project broke this broader question down into four lines of inquiry:

    1. how the pandemic is framed as a policy issue;
    2. what sources of scientific and policy advice policy makers rely on;
    3. to what extent and how effectively governments serve as synthesizers; and,
    4. disseminators of knowledge and technical capacity; and what knowledge claims and policy concepts became subjects of debate. 
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    Funding

    Original funding for this project comes from United States National Science Foundation RAPID Collaborative Grants #2028585 and #2028567.

    A generous grant from Schmidt Futures has allowed the inclusion of additional country cases.

    The following country teams have obtained additional funding from national institutions and foundations: 

    • Austria
    • China
    • France
    • Germany
    • The Netherlands
    • Singapore
    • United Kingdom
    • United States
    © CompCoRe Network